Monday, May 23, 2005

Survival Tips For Smart Moving

BY DAN MORLEY, PRESIDENT

Upgrading to a new facility involves numerous decisions. As a business owner that’s nothing new to you, though. You constantly make high-pressure decisions, so why should moving decisions be any different?

The fact is, unfortunately most owners make avoidable moving mistakes. Here are some frequent mistakes that businesses make in their relocation undertaking.

MISTAKE 1: Forget budget. Full speed ahead. There’s nothing wrong with wanting to get the job done. But by rushing though a budget, you’ll often find yourself forced to eliminate important elements that would have made a project more productive and more appealing to new and old clients. Take the time and really devise an appropriate budget.

MISTAKE 2: I want the lowest price possible. Moving offices involves multiple purchasing decisions. To maximize budgets you’ve got to interrelate these purchases (phones, computers, furniture, carpet, security, movers, construction, etc.). Oftentimes, this lack of coordination leads to tremendous bottlenecks, increasing time and, therefore, costs.

MISTAKE 3: I’d rather do it myself. Companies that try to control every aspect of a project themselves frequently make critical mistakes. They try to become experts at carpeting, blueprints, ergonomics, lighting, and everything else under their control. Spending excessive time and effort trying to complete moving yourself can take away from the success of your core business.

Before jumping in consider all the details: phones, computers, information systems. How and when do you unplug everything without destroying your entire record-keeping and communications system?

MISTAKE 4: What does everyone else think? One of the biggest mistakes can be asking too many people to get involved. Too many opinions and ideas can slow down the decision-making process and cause the move to take forever.

MSTAKE 5: I sign all the checks. I make all the decisions. By never asking for any employee input, however, it can create dissension during a time that should spark excitement. My advice? Show concern. Consider the psychological effect of change on the employees. All it requires is a partner who knows how to prepare employees for the transition from old office to new.

MISTAKE 6: First thing tomorrow. Waiting too long to address key facility issues and postponing decisions can cost the company money, efficiency, and overall appearance. Procrastinating over the interior portions of the office (color schemes, carpeting) can leave you with limited options (colors, products) which otherwise would have been available.

MISTAKE 7: Just do it. While the ability to forge ahead and complete a project is necessary, making quick and rash decisions in the interest of time can be quite detrimental. Building a new facility without any planning could leave your company without any room to grow, or a little research could prove that your current facility with proper remodeling would have been sufficient. The key is to know your company’s goals and directions, which will help to create an integrated plan.

Moving a headquarters or office space to an unfamiliar facility is a serious undertaking and one that involves significant patience, understanding and expertise. Having been key components in several office moves for our clients, bfi has a strong moving management team and is a well-oiled machine in terms of guiding and advising these corporate clients. As such, if you’re planning on relocating your team, we strongly urge you to follow the advice we’ve compiled above to make your transition smooth and seamless. Happy moving!

###

For over 50 years, Business Furniture, Inc. (bfi), has been a leader in furniture specification and furniture project management market. With offices in Elizabeth, Cranbury and Parsippany NJ; New York City and Melville, Long Island, bfi is a nationwide organization offering product and service procurement, delivery and installation, furniture inventory and reconfiguration services and 24/7 on-line customer service. Representing over 200 office furniture manufacturers and recognized as one of America’s largest Herman Miller, Inc. dealerships, bfi employs over 150 professionals serving a diverse customer base in the corporate, governmental, architectural and design and real estate sectors.

For more information, contact bfi’s Elizabeth, New Jersey headquarters at 908-355-3400 or visit www.bfionline.com.

No comments: